Malawi CRS

Site Details

LOCATION

Kamuzu Central Hospital/Tidziwe Centre, Mzimba Road

Lilongwe,

2651755056

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Site Type

CRS

CRS Coordinator

Thokozani Nkhalamba Makuhunga

tmakuhunga@unclilongwe.org

+265 1 755 056

CRS Leader

Lameck Chinula

lameck_chinula@med.unc.edu

265-882483220

Site Trials

Treatment Naïve

Active, Not Recruiting

A5417: Long-Acting Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies at ART Initiation in Adults Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa

This study enrolls people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa at the time that they are about to start antiretroviral therapy (ART). They will be assigned to receive either two long-acting study medications called “monoclonal antibodies” or placebo (normal saline) when they start ART. An antibody is a substance that the body makes in response to an infection. The antibodies in this study attach to HIV and can block HIV from attacking cells in the body and from spreading to other parts of the body. These study antibodies are being developed to potentially treat and prevent HIV.

Tuberculosis

Active, Not Recruiting

A5409: A Phase 2 Randomized, Adaptive, Dose-Ranging, Open-Label Trial of Novel Regimens for the Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis (RAD-TB)

The standard of care (SOC) treatment of tuberculosis (TB) was developed over 40 years ago, and the treatment is long (6 months) and hard. In many settings, the medicine does not work well because people stop taking it or miss doses, which leads to TB returning. For some people, the SOC treatment can cause negative side effects.

 

This study will evaluate new medication regimens for the treatment of TB. This study is adaptive, which means, as new medication regimens are identified for the treatment of TB, some of them will be selected for testing in this study. Therefore, there may be different drug regimens being used as part of the study at different times.

Treatment Naïve

Active, Not Recruiting

A5417: Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of the Combination of two Long-Acting Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies at ART Initiation in Adults Living with HIV-1 in sub-Saharan Africa

This study enrolls people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa at the time that they are about to start antiretroviral therapy (ART). They will be assigned to receive either two long-acting study medications called “monoclonal antibodies” or placebo (normal saline) when they start ART. An antibody is a substance that the body makes in response to an infection. The antibodies in this study attach to HIV and can block HIV from attacking cells in the body and from spreading to other parts of the body. These study antibodies are being developed to potentially treat and prevent HIV.

Tuberculosis

Active, Not Recruiting

A5397/HVTN 603:A Phase 2a/2b Study Evaluating Safety, Immunogenicity, and Therapeutic Efficacy of ID93 + GLA-SE Vaccination in Participants with Rifampicin-Susceptible Pulmonary TB

Effective tuberculosis (TB) treatment is available and saves millions of lives, but it has not had a significant impact on the global TB epidemic. The treatment requires strict adherence to taking the medicine on schedule, and if it isn’t taken as directed people can relapse before they complete treatment. TB can recur in up to 8% of people who successfully complete TB treatment. Having an effective TB vaccine to prevent TB infection and control TB disease is essential to eliminate TB globally.

 

A5397/HVTN 603 will give participants 2 injections of a study vaccine called ID93+GLA-SE or a placebo at different times after they have started taking TB treatment. The researchers will compare responses in people who get the study vaccine to people who get the placebo. This study will enroll both people with and without HIV. It is the first to test ID93 + GLA-SE in people living with HIV (PLWH).

Treatment Experienced

Open and enrolling

A5403: Giving Standardized Estradiol Therapy In Transgender Women to Research Interactions with HIV Therapy: the GET IT RIgHT Study

Transgender women (TW) are the fastest-growing group of people with HIV. Historically, TW have had few opportunities to participate in research, and often experience barriers to engaging in care. More research is needed to help providers when it comes to choosing HIV medications in TW on Feminizing Hormone Therapy (FHT). This is an open-label, non-randomized trial of adult TW on three types of HIV medications who will receive estradiol for FHT for 48 weeks.

HIV Cure

Treatment Experienced

Open and enrolling

A5321: Decay of HIV-1 Reservoirs in Participants on Long-Term Antiretroviral Therapy: The ACTG HIV Reservoirs Cohort (AHRC) Study

AHRC (pronounced “ARC”) is a study of differences and changes over time in HIV reservoirs (groups of HIV-infected cells that “hide” from anti-HIV medications). This study enrolls people into one of six groups, based on their different HIV treatment histories. The current version of this study is only enrolling for Group 6, which will include people who acquired or are suspected to have acquired HIV while taking long-acting cabotegravir (LA CAB) for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

HIV Treatment

Closed to accrual

A5381: Observational Cohort to Assess Therapeutic Efficacy and Emergence of HIV Drug Resistance Following Initiation of Tenofovir-Lamivudine-Dolutegravir (TLD) for First- or Second-Line ART

This is a study for people who have HIV and qualify to switch to or receive Dolutegravir containing antiretroviral therapy (ART, group of medicine used to treat HIV). Taking TLD (combination pill of three medicines for HIV, tenofovir-lamivudine-dolutegravir) has shown to be better tolerated, work better against the virus known as virologic efficacy, have fewer drug-drug interactions, and have less frequent onset of HIV drug resistance than Efavirenz containing ART. In August 2017, a decision was made to start using TLD for first- and second-line ART in many places in the world. This study is designed to help us understand the risks and benefits of TLD roll-out in low- and middle-income countries that may not use viral load testing and HIV resistance testing (a way to measure if a drug will work against your HIV) to guide ART management.  Each participant will be assigned to one of four groups:

  • Group 1: Participants switching to TLD, after taking prior anti-HIV medication that contains a NNRTI drug (a group of medicines scientifically known as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as Efavirenz or Nevirapine).
  • Group 2: Participants switching to TLD, after taking anti-HIV medication that contains a PI drug (a group of medicines scientifically known as protease inhibitors, such as Lopinavir or Atazanavir).
  • Group 3: Participants taking TLD and receiving medication for TB (tuberculosis) that includes the drug rifampicin. These participants must be starting one or both of these medications when they enter the study.
  • Group 4: Participants starting TLD who have not taken anti-HIV medication before.

There will be 1350 participants enrolled in the study.