Harbor University of California Los Angeles Center CRS

Site Details

LOCATION

CDCRC Building

1124 West Carson Street

Torrance, CA . 90502

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Site Type

CRS

CRS Coordinator

Mario Guerrero

mguerrero@labiomed.org

310-222-3848

CRS Leader

Eric Daar

edaar@labiomed.org

310-222-2467

Site Trials

Treatment Experienced

Closed to accrual

A5415: A Limited-Center, Prospective, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study to Evaluate the Effects of Cenicriviroc Mesylate on Arterial Inflammation in People Living with HIV

People with HIV can have an increase in inflammation in their body organs even after taking anti-HIV medicines (ART, or antiretroviral therapy). Chronic HIV infection has been associated with a state of systemic inflammation and immune activation, thus increasing the incidence of heart disease and death from heart disease. HIV researchers are studying the harmful effects of this long-term inflammation and possible ways to prevent these complications.

 

The A5415 study is being conducted to investigate the effects of cenicriviroc (CVC) on arterial inflammation in individuals with HIV on stable suppressive ART. CVC is a medication being developed as a treatment for HIV and being studied as a possible drug to decrease blood vessel inflammation and plaque formation in the setting of chronic infection.

Treatment Naïve

Active, Not Recruiting

A5388: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Combination HIV-Specific Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Combined with ART Initiation during Acute HIV Infection to Induce HIV Remission

Scientists are looking for ways to minimize the distribution of HIV-1 in the body, especially where anti-HIV medications (ART) are unable to reach. Starting ART as soon as possible following a diagnosis of Acute HIV Infection (AHI) has been shown to better preserve the immune system. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), when administered with ART, also have the potential to prevent the HIV virus from being able to reproduce.

 

This is a randomized, placebo-controlled research study that will enroll adults with recently diagnosed AHI. All participants will begin ART at entry and receive a single dose of two bNAbs (VRC07-523LS and PGT121.414.LS) or placebos. Everyone will be followed for about 1 year after starting ART, then stop ART for up to 2.5 years, then be followed for 1 year after restarting ART.

Treatment Experienced

Open and enrolling

A5385: An Observational Post-Intervention Cohort Destination Protocol

This study is a two-step, non-interventional extension study for individuals participating in another interventional HIV cure trial (parent study) that includes an analytical treatment interruption (ATI) (stopping anti-HIV therapy [ART] while monitoring viral load). Participants will be individuals who achieved post-intervention control (PIC) (maintaining HIV suppression after treatment interruption) in their parent study.

 

Step 1 will consist of an extended ATI period in which PICs will be monitored for safety, viral, and immune outcomes. Time to viral rebound and restart of antiretroviral therapy (ART) will be measured. Participants will begin Step 2 if they meet ART restart criteria and will be monitored for safety, immune, and viral outcomes through 48 weeks after ART restart.

Treatment Experienced

Open and enrolling

A5374: A Phase I/IIa Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Conserved-Mosaic T-cell Vaccine in a Regimen with Vesatolimod and Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in Adults Initiated on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy during Acute HIV-1

Current antiretroviral therapy (ART) does not cure HIV. ART just holds the virus in check so it cannot multiply and destroy the immune system. When most people talk about a cure for HIV, they generally imagine a cure that would remove all virus from the body. However, many researchers are looking for a different approach, known as a functional cure, that would improve the immune system response to HIV so that it controls the virus and allows for longer periods during which a person with HIV could stop taking ART.

 

Treatment Experienced

Open and enrolling

A5403: Giving Standardized Estradiol Therapy In Transgender Women to Research Interactions with HIV Therapy: the GET IT RIgHT Study

Transgender women (TW) are the fastest-growing group of people with HIV. Historically, TW have had few opportunities to participate in research, and often experience barriers to engaging in care. More research is needed to help providers when it comes to choosing HIV medications in TW on Feminizing Hormone Therapy (FHT). This is an open-label, non-randomized trial of adult TW on three types of HIV medications who will receive estradiol for FHT for 48 weeks.

HIV Treatment

Open and enrolling

A5359: The LATITUDE Study: Long-Acting Therapy to Improve Treatment SUccess in Daily LifE - A Phase III Study to Evaluate Long-Acting Antiretroviral Therapy in Non-adherent HIV-Infected Individuals

This four-step study compares Long-Acting (LA) Injectable Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) to standard of care (SOC) oral ART in previously non-adherent individuals.

· Step 1 is the induction phase and all participants receive SOC oral ART. Participants receive financial incentives for meeting study-specified goals.

· Step 2 is the randomization phase and participants are randomized 1:1 to receive LA injectable ART (cabotegravir and rilpivirine injections) or continue on SOC for 52 weeks.

· Step 3 is the crossover/continuation phase. Participants randomized to LA ART will continue that therapy, and eligible SOC participants will cross-over to receive LA ART for 52 weeks.

· Step 4 is the observational phase that switches participants who received at least one LA ART injection and are no longer eligible for injections back to locally sourced SOC oral ART for 52 weeks.

HIV Cure

Closed to accrual

A5354: Effect of Antiretroviral Treatment Initiated During Acute HIV-1 Infection on Measures of HIV-1 Persistence and on HIV-1-Specific Immune Responses

Will evaluate whether starting antiretroviral drugs very early in HIV infection will limit the virus from getting into hidden areas of the body (reservoirs) and change how the immune system helps to control the virus.

This study will include people who have very recently been infected with HIV and will start anti-HIV (antiretroviral) drugs right away to see how this may change HIV’s impact on the body.

HIV Cure

Treatment Experienced

Open and enrolling

A5321: Decay of HIV-1 Reservoirs in Participants on Long-Term Antiretroviral Therapy: The ACTG HIV Reservoirs Cohort (AHRC) Study

AHRC (pronounced “ARC”) is a study of differences and changes over time in HIV reservoirs (groups of HIV-infected cells that “hide” from anti-HIV medications). This study enrolls people into one of six groups, based on their different HIV treatment histories. The current version of this study is only enrolling for Group 6, which will include people who acquired or are suspected to have acquired HIV while taking long-acting cabotegravir (LA CAB) for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

Hepatitis

HIV comorbidities and complications

HIV Cure

HIV Treatment

Tuberculosis

Open and enrolling

A5128: Plan for Obtaining Informed Consent to use Stored Human Biological Materials (HBM) for Currently Unspecified Analysis.

Designed to develop a standard operating procedure to establish a storage bank for specimens for future HIV DNA analyses.

Informed consent to use stored specimens for currently unspecified/ genetic analyses.

HIV Treatment

Closed to accrual

A5357: A Study of Long-Acting Cabotegravir Plus VRC-HIVMAB075-00-AB (VRC07-523LS) to Maintain Viral Suppression in Adults Living with HIV-1

This study is for people with HIV who have an undetectable viral load. The study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a combination of two medications. The first drug is called long-acting cabotegravir (CAB), which will be given orally during Part 1 of the study and then as an injection every 4 weeks during Part 2 of the study. The second drug is called VRC07-523LS, which is a monoclonal antibody. A monoclonal antibody targets human proteins rather than attacking the virus directly. This drug will be given intravenously (directly into a vein) over about 15 to 30 minutes every 8 weeks.

 

HIV comorbidities and complications

Closed to accrual

A5322: Long-Term Follow-up of Older HIV-infected Adults in the ACTG: Addressing Issues of Aging, HIV Infection and Inflammation (HAILO)

You are being asked to take part in this research study because you are infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, and were previously followed in the ALLRT (A5001) study and are 40 years of age or older. This study, A5322 (also known as the HAILO study), is a long-term follow-up study of persons who have HIV and received their first treatment for HIV known as antiretroviral medications, in certain clinical trials that were done by the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG).

 

HIV comorbidities and complications

Closed to accrual

A5361s: Pitavastatin to REduce Physical Function Impairment and FRailty in HIV (PREPARE)

Aging with HIV may be associated with an earlier development of frailty (weakness) or disability, including difficulties in tests of strength or walking speed. Few treatments have been shown to prevent or slow these impairments in people with or without HIV. Some studies have suggested that the class of drugs called statins, such as pitavastatin, might be helpful in slowing frailty or disability. This might happen by decreasing fat within the muscle, or by decreasing inflammation markers in the blood. This study uses the REPRIEVE Trial (A5332) and the REPRIEVE Mechanistic Substudy (A5333s) to study the impact of pitavastatin on muscle.

Hepatitis

Closed to accrual

A5379: B-ENHANCEMENT OF HBV VACCINATION IN PERSONS LIVING WITH HIV (BEe-HIVe): Evaluation of HEPLISAV-B

A5379 is a study looking at hepatitis B vaccination in adults living with HIV. Hepatitis B is a serious viral infection that affects the liver and is transmitted through blood and body fluids. The study will involve individuals who have received a previous hepatitis B vaccination but the vaccine did not respond well and individuals who have never received the vaccination. The study will take place both in the US and internationally. The study will compare how well an individual responds to the vaccine in different groups based on the type of vaccine and number of doses.

HIV comorbidities and complications

Closed to accrual

A5391: Doravirine for Obese Persons on Integrase Inhibitors and Tenofovir Alafenamide

Weight gain after starting HIV therapy is common, but recent studies have found that some people with HIV (PWH) who are taking an integrase inhibitor (INSTI) combined with a tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) regimen may gain more weight than people taking other drug combinations.  A rising number of PWH are overweight or obese, and a higher body mass index (BMI) increases the risk for diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

 

This study will include PWH who have been virally suppressed on a regimen consisting of an integrase inhibitor (INSTI) and TAF/FTC or TAF/3TC, and have a BMI of 30 kg/m2 (the cut-off for obesity) or greater. This research study is trying to find out if they could gain less weight, or maybe lose weight, after switching to a regimen containing doravirine (DOR) with TAF/FTC (or TAF/3TC), or DOR with the related medication tenofovir disproxil (TDF/FTC [or TDF/3TC]) as compared to continuation of their current INSTI plus TAF regimen.

 

HIV comorbidities and complications

Closed to accrual

A5355: Phase II, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Immunogenicity of a Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)-based Anti-Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Vaccine (Triplex®) in Adults with Both Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 and CMV Who Are on Potent Combination ART with Conserved Immune Function

Since the early days of the HIV epidemic cytomegalovirus (CMV) has been one of the most common and devastating opportunistic infections (OIs) experienced by people with HIV. CMV is a common virus that usually causes few, mild, or no symptoms and typically remains in the body for life; in people with weakened immune systems, however, CMV can cause more serious symptoms affecting the eyes, lungs, liver, esophagus, stomach, and intestines ). HIV and CMV can work together against our bodies’ defenses, making transmission of each virus easier. We would like to change this.

In this study, you will be randomized to one of the study treatment arms. You will receive either Triplex® study vaccine or placebo by injection into the muscle of your shoulder 2 times; once when you enter the study and again about 4 weeks later.

HIV comorbidities and complications

Closed to accrual

A5383: Randomized, Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Anti-inflammatory Efficacy of Letermovir (Prevymis) in Adults with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 and Asymptomatic Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Who Are on Suppressive ART and Its Effect on Chronic Inflammation, HIV Persistence, and Other Clinical Outcomes (ELICIT)

This study will include 180 participants. Participants will have HIV and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). CMV is common virus that many people living with and without HIV have been exposed to. You do not need to know if you have CMV to be considered for study participation. About half of the study participants will be given study medication to be taken once daily for 48 weeks. The study medication will be letermovir, an FDA approved medication to prevent CMV. The other half of
participants will not receive any additional medication. The study will last about 1 year and 2 months.