Brigham and Women's Hospital Therapeutics (BWH TCRS) CRS

Site Details

LOCATION

Brigham and Women's Hospital ACTG Clinical Research Site

75 Francis Street

PBBA-4

Boston, MA. 02115

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Site Type

CRS

CRS Coordinator

Cheryl Keenan

ckeenan@bwh.harvard.edu

617-732-5635

CTRS Leader

Dr. Jennifer Manne-Goehler

jmanne@partners.org

617-726-0198 

Site Trials

Treatment Experienced

Closed to accrual

A5415: A Limited-Center, Prospective, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study to Evaluate the Effects of Cenicriviroc Mesylate on Arterial Inflammation in People Living with HIV

People with HIV can have an increase in inflammation in their body organs even after taking anti-HIV medicines (ART, or antiretroviral therapy). Chronic HIV infection has been associated with a state of systemic inflammation and immune activation, thus increasing the incidence of heart disease and death from heart disease. HIV researchers are studying the harmful effects of this long-term inflammation and possible ways to prevent these complications.

 

The A5415 study is being conducted to investigate the effects of cenicriviroc (CVC) on arterial inflammation in individuals with HIV on stable suppressive ART. CVC is a medication being developed as a treatment for HIV and being studied as a possible drug to decrease blood vessel inflammation and plaque formation in the setting of chronic infection.

Treatment Experienced

Open and enrolling

A5385: An Observational Post-Intervention Cohort Destination Protocol

This study is a two-step, non-interventional extension study for individuals participating in another interventional HIV cure trial (parent study) that includes an analytical treatment interruption (ATI) (stopping anti-HIV therapy [ART] while monitoring viral load). Participants will be individuals who achieved post-intervention control (PIC) (maintaining HIV suppression after treatment interruption) in their parent study.

 

Step 1 will consist of an extended ATI period in which PICs will be monitored for safety, viral, and immune outcomes. Time to viral rebound and restart of antiretroviral therapy (ART) will be measured. Participants will begin Step 2 if they meet ART restart criteria and will be monitored for safety, immune, and viral outcomes through 48 weeks after ART restart.

HIV Treatment

Open and enrolling

A5359: The LATITUDE Study: Long-Acting Therapy to Improve Treatment SUccess in Daily LifE - A Phase III Study to Evaluate Long-Acting Antiretroviral Therapy in Non-adherent HIV-Infected Individuals

This four-step study compares Long-Acting (LA) Injectable Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) to standard of care (SOC) oral ART in previously non-adherent individuals.

· Step 1 is the induction phase and all participants receive SOC oral ART. Participants receive financial incentives for meeting study-specified goals.

· Step 2 is the randomization phase and participants are randomized 1:1 to receive LA injectable ART (cabotegravir and rilpivirine injections) or continue on SOC for 52 weeks.

· Step 3 is the crossover/continuation phase. Participants randomized to LA ART will continue that therapy, and eligible SOC participants will cross-over to receive LA ART for 52 weeks.

· Step 4 is the observational phase that switches participants who received at least one LA ART injection and are no longer eligible for injections back to locally sourced SOC oral ART for 52 weeks.

HIV Cure

Treatment Experienced

Open and enrolling

A5321: Decay of HIV-1 Reservoirs in Participants on Long-Term Antiretroviral Therapy: The ACTG HIV Reservoirs Cohort (AHRC) Study

AHRC (pronounced “ARC”) is a study of differences and changes over time in HIV reservoirs (groups of HIV-infected cells that “hide” from anti-HIV medications). This study enrolls people into one of six groups, based on their different HIV treatment histories. The current version of this study is only enrolling for Group 6, which will include people who acquired or are suspected to have acquired HIV while taking long-acting cabotegravir (LA CAB) for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

HIV comorbidities and complications

Closed to accrual

A5322: Long-Term Follow-up of Older HIV-infected Adults in the ACTG: Addressing Issues of Aging, HIV Infection and Inflammation (HAILO)

You are being asked to take part in this research study because you are infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, and were previously followed in the ALLRT (A5001) study and are 40 years of age or older. This study, A5322 (also known as the HAILO study), is a long-term follow-up study of persons who have HIV and received their first treatment for HIV known as antiretroviral medications, in certain clinical trials that were done by the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG).

 

HIV comorbidities and complications

Closed to accrual

A5332: REPRIEVE Trial

In this study, people between the ages of 40 and 75 with HIV will be randomized (like flipping a coin) to take the pill pitavastatin OR a placebo (non-active pill) to see if pitavastatin can help prevent heart disease and death in people who are taking HIV medication. You will not know if you are taking pitavastatin or placebo. The REPRIEVE trial will enroll about 7500 people from several countries.

HIV comorbidities and complications

Closed to accrual

A5361s: Pitavastatin to REduce Physical Function Impairment and FRailty in HIV (PREPARE)

Aging with HIV may be associated with an earlier development of frailty (weakness) or disability, including difficulties in tests of strength or walking speed. Few treatments have been shown to prevent or slow these impairments in people with or without HIV. Some studies have suggested that the class of drugs called statins, such as pitavastatin, might be helpful in slowing frailty or disability. This might happen by decreasing fat within the muscle, or by decreasing inflammation markers in the blood. This study uses the REPRIEVE Trial (A5332) and the REPRIEVE Mechanistic Substudy (A5333s) to study the impact of pitavastatin on muscle.

HIV Cure

Closed to accrual

A5366: Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators to Enhance the Efficacy of Viral Reactivation with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

While antiretrovirals known as ARV’s (group of medicines used to treat HIV) have provided very effective treatment of HIV, cure of HIV from the body has not been possible.  One of the reasons may be due to virus hiding in resting (or ‘latent’) immune cells. This reservoir (the hidden virus) is able to reproduce itself and serves as source of infection if ARV’s are stopped. Some investigational medications have been shown to wake up latent (sleeping) immune cells allowing them to get rid of the virus they have inside them. However, these therapies are only partly effective and results vary in different people. Preliminary studies have shown that these therapies may be less effective in women due to female hormones.

This study will evaluate one of the medications (Vorinostat) that have been shown to reverse latency in combination with another medication (Tamoxifen) that researchers hope will enhance that effect, specifically in women.

Hepatitis

Closed to accrual

A5379: B-ENHANCEMENT OF HBV VACCINATION IN PERSONS LIVING WITH HIV (BEe-HIVe): Evaluation of HEPLISAV-B

A5379 is a study looking at hepatitis B vaccination in adults living with HIV. Hepatitis B is a serious viral infection that affects the liver and is transmitted through blood and body fluids. The study will involve individuals who have received a previous hepatitis B vaccination but the vaccine did not respond well and individuals who have never received the vaccination. The study will take place both in the US and internationally. The study will compare how well an individual responds to the vaccine in different groups based on the type of vaccine and number of doses.

HIV comorbidities and complications

Closed to accrual

A5391: Doravirine for Obese Persons on Integrase Inhibitors and Tenofovir Alafenamide

Weight gain after starting HIV therapy is common, but recent studies have found that some people with HIV (PWH) who are taking an integrase inhibitor (INSTI) combined with a tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) regimen may gain more weight than people taking other drug combinations.  A rising number of PWH are overweight or obese, and a higher body mass index (BMI) increases the risk for diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

 

This study will include PWH who have been virally suppressed on a regimen consisting of an integrase inhibitor (INSTI) and TAF/FTC or TAF/3TC, and have a BMI of 30 kg/m2 (the cut-off for obesity) or greater. This research study is trying to find out if they could gain less weight, or maybe lose weight, after switching to a regimen containing doravirine (DOR) with TAF/FTC (or TAF/3TC), or DOR with the related medication tenofovir disproxil (TDF/FTC [or TDF/3TC]) as compared to continuation of their current INSTI plus TAF regimen.

 

HIV comorbidities and complications

Closed to accrual

A5383: Randomized, Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Anti-inflammatory Efficacy of Letermovir (Prevymis) in Adults with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 and Asymptomatic Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Who Are on Suppressive ART and Its Effect on Chronic Inflammation, HIV Persistence, and Other Clinical Outcomes (ELICIT)

This study will include 180 participants. Participants will have HIV and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). CMV is common virus that many people living with and without HIV have been exposed to. You do not need to know if you have CMV to be considered for study participation. About half of the study participants will be given study medication to be taken once daily for 48 weeks. The study medication will be letermovir, an FDA approved medication to prevent CMV. The other half of
participants will not receive any additional medication. The study will last about 1 year and 2 months.

COVID-19 and Mpox

Open and enrolling

A5418: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Trial of the Safety and Efficacy of Tecovirimat for the Treatment of Human Mpox Disease

A5418 (STOMP) is a study of tecovirimat (also known as TPOXX) for the treatment of human monkeypox virus (HMPXV) disease.