Have you
Tested Positive for
COVID-19 and have
symptoms?

We need your help. Join the ACTIV-2 Study and help find the treatments we need to protect our communities and reclaim our lives.
To learn more about the ACTIV-2 study enrolling right now click on the button below.

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Rise Above Covid

What is
Rise Above COVID?

Rise Above COVID is a movement to find medicines for COVID-19 through the ACTIV-2 Studies. Finding safe and effective treatments in addition to vaccines will help us get back to the way things were.

What is Rise Above COVID?
Discovering Treatments to Beat COVID-19

Discovering Treatments to Beat COVID-19

You can receive study care at no cost while helping researchers discover which medicines are most likely to help friends and family members who have been diagnosed with COVID-19.

Types of Treatments Being Studied

The ACTIV-2 Studies are testing different investigational treatments to see if they are safe and can help adults with COVID-19 who are not fully vaccinated or who have a weak immune system, get better. The treatments being studied work in different ways to help fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Some treatments are designed to block the virus from entering and harming your cells. For example, some monoclonal antibodies are made to bind to the spike on the surface of the virus, which prevents it from entering your cells. Other treatments may be able to help activate your immune system against the virus that causes COVID-19.

Some of these treatments being studied, may be given as an infusion (through a thin tube attached to a small needle in the arm), an injection (shot) into the skin, a tablet or pill to be taken by mouth (orally), or inhaled (breathed in). You will not be able to choose which treatment you are given.

Medicines come in all different forms:

Pills taken by mouth
Pills taken by mouth
A shot or injection
A shot or injection
An infusion
An infusion
Inhaled medicine

About Us

How ACTIV Got Started

How ACTIV Got Started

On April 17, 2020 the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced the Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV) public-private partnership to develop a coordinated research strategy for prioritizing and speeding development of the most promising treatments and vaccines.

Coordinated by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), ACTIV brings NIH together with its sibling agencies in the Department of Health and Human Services, including the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA); other government agencies including the Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA); the European Medicines Agency (EMA); and representatives from academia, philanthropic organizations, and numerous biopharmaceutical companies.

Leadership Team

Meet the lead team of physicians and researchers on the ACTIV-2 Study.

Joseph Eron, MD

ACTG Co-Chair

Eric Daar, MD

ACTIV-2 co-PI

Kara Chew, MD

ACTIV-2 co-PI

Carlee Moser, PhD

Statistician

Peter Kim, MD

NIH Representative

Bill Erhardt, MD

NIH Representative

Jonathan Li, MD

Protocol Virologist

Upinder Singh, MD

Investigator

Katya Corado, MD

Investigator

Community Advisory Board

The Community Advisory Board (CAB) supports community outreach, education, and participation in clinical research, advising on community concerns and best practices for the ACTIV-2 Study.

Allegra Cermak

Rockville, Maryland

Orbit R. Clanton

New York, New York

Bill Hall

Seattle, Washington

Ángel L. Hernández

Orocovis, Puerto Rico

Rose James

New York, New York

Jan Kosmyna

North Royalton, Ohio

Michael Louella

Seattle, Washington

Morénike Giwa Onaiwu

Houston, Texas

Rosa Reyes

New York, New York

Mikyla Sakurai

Seattle, Washington

Christine Sikkema

Cincinatti, Ohio

Rona Siskind

Silver Spring, Maryland

Tony Wafford

Inglewood, California

Get Informed

What is a Clinical Study?

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19: 101

COVID-19 stands for “coronavirus disease 2019.” It’s caused by a type of virus identified in 2019 called SARS-CoV-2 and has been making people sick all over the world (pandemic). Although this virus mainly affects the lungs, it has been shown to affect many other organs as well, such as the heart, kidneys, and nervous system.

Although we’re still learning a lot about the virus, there is some information that we can share.

We’ll cover some of the important points, such as how this coronavirus spreads, and what symptoms it can cause.

What is COVID-19?
How does COVID-19 spread?

COVID-19 spreads quickly and is very contagious. It spreads mainly through the air when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or even talks and another person inhales the virus particles. These tiny particles can linger in the air and pile up, especially indoors where many people are gathered.

You may also get COVID-19 by touching a contaminated* surface and then touching your face, although this isn’t the main way the virus spreads.

*A contaminated surface is something that has the virus on it from a sick person coughing, sneezing, or touching it with unwashed hands.

COVID-19 can make some people really sick and others not so sick.

Symptoms vary from mild (not so bad) to severe (really bad) and can even be life-threatening.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Symptoms may not show up for days. The virus has an incubation period of about 2 to 14 days. So it’s possible that some people may spread the virus without even knowing they have it.

Some people are more likely than others to get really sick–like those with certain health problems (for example, heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease, diabetes, or a weak immune system) or the elderly, but that doesn’t mean young people can’t get really sick, too. Some people also seem to suffer from long-term symptoms even once the infection is cleared.

Most common symptoms include:

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?
How is COVID-19 treated?

Because COVID-19 is a new disease, right now, there are not many treatments. The treatments that are available may not work for everyone and are in very limited supply. Researchers are hard at work looking for treatments, and several potential treatments are currently being studied in clinical trials.

If you come down with a fever or any symptoms of COVID-19, call your doctor right away.

How can we stop COVID-19 from spreading?

A vaccine is the best way to prevent getting the virus. Currently, several vaccines have been authorized for use. However, not everyone will choose to or be able to receive the vaccine. And for those with weak immune systems (due to cancer, health problems, or medication), the vaccine may not be enough.

There are other things we can do to slow the spread of COVID-19:

There are other things we can do to slow the spread of COVID-19:

Social distancing lessens the chance of people who are sick coming in contact with people who are not sick.

There are other things we can do to slow the spread of COVID-19:

Depending on where you live, you may be asked to wear a face covering certain places.

There are other things we can do to slow the spread of COVID-19:

It can be hard to not see family members or friends, or to not be able to go out, but social distancing, along with frequent handwashing and wearing face coverings, are the best ways to slow down the number of people getting sick.

You can help to slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives!

Social distancing

Social distancing

Don’t touch your face.

Don’t touch your face.

Face masks help slow the spread of COVID-19

Face masks help slow the spread of COVID-19

Clean commonly used surfaces regularly.

Clean commonly used surfaces regularly.

Wash your hands with soap for 20 seconds. If soap isn’t available, use hand sanitizer.

Wash your hands with soap for 20 seconds. If soap isn’t available, use hand sanitizer.

Sneeze or cough into your elbow.

Sneeze or cough into your elbow.

Get tested if you develop symptoms.

Get tested if you develop symptoms.

Stay home if you are sick.

Stay home if you are sick.

What are the ACTIV-2 Studies?

What are the ACTIV-2 Studies?

The ACTIV-2 Studies are testing different medicines to see if they are safe and can help adults with COVID-19 who are not fully vaccinated but are at risk for serious illness, and adults who may or may not be vaccinated but have a weak immune system. Finding treatments for COVID-19 is important because the virus has been spreading quickly all over the world and can cause serious sickness and even death.

Researchers want to see if the medicines are:

Safe

Safe

Can help people get better faster

Can help people get better faster

Can get rid of the virus

Can get rid of the virus

Can keep people from getting sicker

Can keep people from getting sicker

Can prevent people from having to go to the hospital

Can prevent people from having to go to the hospital

Who can be in the ACTIV-2 Studies?

The ACTIV-2 Study is for adults 18 years and older who:

Tested positive for COVID-19

Tested positive for COVID-19

Are at home (not in the hospital)

Are at home (not in the hospital)

Have COVID-19 symptoms

Have COVID-19 symptoms

Are not fully vaccinated* and are at high risk for serious illness
Have a weak immune system (due to cancer, health problems, or medication) whether or not they are fully vaccinated

Are not fully vaccinated* and are at high risk for serious illness

or

Have a weak immune system (due to cancer, health problems, or medication) whether or not they are fully vaccinated

*Not fully vaccinated means you have not received 2 shots of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine or 1 shot of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine

Symptoms of COVID19 may include:

Symptoms of COVID19 may include:

What happens during the study?

You will first give your permission to be in the study. You will then answer some questions to make sure the study is right for you. If it is, you will be assigned to a treatment group. During the study, you may have tests and health checks to see how you are doing. Talk to the study doctor for more information.

  • 1. PERMISSION

    If you agree to be in the study, you will give your permission by signing an informed consent form.

    The informed consent contains all of the important information about the study. Ask questions and make sure you understand the study before signing the form.

  • 2. SCREENING

    You will answer some questions to make sure the study is right for you.

  • 3. ENTRY VISIT

    You will meet with a researcher for tests and to be placed in a treatment group.

    You will be placed in a treatment group by chance, like flipping a coin.

  • 4. TREATMENT AND CLINIC VISITS

    Take the medicine exactly as the researcher explains to you. You will also have visits with a researcher for tests and phone calls from home with the researcher or nurse. The number of visits and phone calls you have will depend on the treatment you receive.

You may have some of the following tests:

You may have some of the following tests:

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 is the sickness caused by a new coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2 which has spread all over the world. It can cause serious problems like pneumonia (an inflammation of the lungs) in some people. This can result in hospitalization and can be life-threatening. Click here for more information on COVID-19.

Are there any treatments for COVID-19?

Because COVID-19 is a new disease, right now there are few treatments available. These treatments may not work for everyone and are in very limited supply. Researchers are hard at work looking for treatments, and several potential treatments are currently being studied in clinical trials.

What are the possible risks of being in the study?

Being in any clinical study may have some risks. There is a chance that the study medicine may cause side effects. There is a chance that the medicine may not work and may not make you feel better or stop you from getting sicker.

What are the ACTIV-2 Studies testing?

The ACTIV-2 Studies are testing several different medicines to see if they are safe and can help adults with COVID-19 who are not fully vaccinated but are at risk for serious illness, and adults who may or may not be vaccinated but have a weak immune system, get better. Researchers also want to know if the medicines can stop the disease from getting worse so that people don’t have to go to the hospital.

What are the possible benefits from being in the study?

The benefits of the study medicine are not known, but there is a chance that it may work and make you feel better or stop you from getting sicker. Even if you do not directly benefit from the study medicine, you will be getting personal medical care and any information learned from this study may help others in your community who have COVID-19.

Who can be in the ACTIV-2 Studies?

The studies are for adults 18 years and older who have tested positive for COVID-19 and are at home with symptoms. To be considered for the studies, you must either not be fully vaccinated and are at high risk for serious illness, or have a weak immune system (due to cancer, health problems, or medication) whether or not you are fully vaccinated. (Not fully vaccinated means you have not received 2 shots of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine or 1 shot of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine).

Would being in the study cost me money?

You do not have to pay for study visits or tests. Check with your insurance company to see if they would pay for medical care related to the study medicine if needed. Costs related to hospital stays will not be covered by the study.

What study medicine would I get if I joined the study?

The studies are testing many different investigational medicines for COVID-19. You would be placed in a group by chance. You won’t know what group you are in until the end of the study. Click here for more information on treatment.

Will I receive any reimbursement if I join the study?

Yes, you will be reimbursed for your time and contributions. The amount varies by location. There may also be support for travel to study visits. The study coordinator will discuss reimbursement with you.