Comparison of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Participants Enrolled in a Multinational Clinical Trial: HPTN 052.

TitleComparison of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Participants Enrolled in a Multinational Clinical Trial: HPTN 052.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsGreer AE, San Ou S-, Wilson E, Piwowar-Manning E, Forman MS, McCauley M, Gamble T, Ruangyuttikarn C, Hosseinipour MC, Kumarasamy N, Nyirenda M, Grinsztejn B, Pilotto JHenrique, Kosashunhanan N, de Melo MGonçalves, Makhema J, Akelo V, Panchia R, Badal-Faesen S, Chen YQ, Cohen MS, Eshleman SH, Thio CL, Valsamakis A
JournalJ Acquir Immune Defic Syndr
Volume76
Issue4
Pagination388-393
Date Published2017 Dec 01
ISSN1944-7884
KeywordsAdult, Africa, Alanine Transaminase, Aspartate Aminotransferases, Brazil, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Coinfection, Female, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis B Surface Antigens, Hepatitis B virus, HIV Infections, Humans, India, Male, Prevalence, Thailand, Viral Load
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Data comparing hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HIV-infected [HIV(+)], and HIV-uninfected [HIV(-)] individuals recruited into the same study are limited. HBV infection status and chronic hepatitis B (cHB) were characterized in a multinational clinical trial: HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN 052).

METHOD: HBV infection status at enrollment was compared between HIV(+) (N = 1241) and HIV(-) (N = 1232) from 7 HBV-endemic countries. Hepatitis B e antigen and plasma HBV DNA were determined in cHB. Median CD4, median plasma HIV RNA, and prevalence of transaminase elevation were compared in HIV(+) with and without cHB. Significance was assessed with χ, Fisher exact, and median tests.

RESULTS: Among all participants, 33.6% had HBV exposure without cHB (8.9% isolated HBV core antibody, "HBcAb"; 24.7% HBcAb and anti-HB surface antibody positive, "recovered"), 4.3% had cHB, 8.9% were vaccinated, and 53.5% were uninfected. Data were similar among HIV(+) and HIV(-) except for isolated HBcAb, which was more prevalent in HIV(+) than HIV(-) [10.1% vs. 7.7%, P = 0.046]. Median HBV DNA trended higher in HIV(+) than in HIV(-). In HIV(+) with cHB versus those without cHB, transaminase elevations were more prevalent (alanine aminotransferase ≤ grade 2, 12% vs. 5.2%, P = 0.037; aspartate aminotransferase ≤ grade 2, 26% vs. 6.0%, P < 0.001), CD4 trended lower, and HIV RNA was similar.

CONCLUSIONS: HBV infection status did not differ by HIV infection status. HIV co-infection was associated with isolated HBcAb and a trend of increased HBV DNA. In HIV, cHB was associated with mild transaminase elevations and a trend toward lower CD4.

DOI10.1097/QAI.0000000000001511
Alternate JournalJ. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PubMed ID28749822
PubMed Central IDPMC5659928
Grant ListUM1 AI069423 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UM1 AI069456 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UM1 AI069432 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UM1 AI069518 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UM1 AI069399 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
U01 AI068636 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UM1 AI069463 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
U01 AI068617 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
U01 AI068613 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UM1 AI068619 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UM1 AI068613 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UM1 AI068617 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States