Long-term body composition changes in antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected individuals.

TitleLong-term body composition changes in antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected individuals.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsGrant PM, Kitch D, McComsey GA, Collier AC, Bartali B, Koletar SL, Erlandson KM, Lake JE, Yin MT, Melbourne K, Ha B, Brown TT
JournalAIDS
Volume30
Issue18
Pagination2805-2813
Date Published2016 Nov 28
ISSN1473-5571
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Body composition impacts physical function and mortality. We compared long-term body composition changes after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in HIV-infected individuals to that in HIV-uninfected controls.

DESIGN: Prospective observational study.

METHODS: We performed dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) approximately 7.5 years after initial DXA in available HIV-infected individuals who received DXAs during the randomized treatment trial AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5202. For controls, we used DXA results from HIV-uninfected participants in the Boston Area Community Health/Bone and Women's Interagency HIV Study cohorts. Repeated measures analyses compared adjusted body composition changes between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals. Multivariable analyses evaluated factors associated with body composition change in HIV-infected individuals.

RESULTS: We obtained DXA results in 97 HIV-infected and 614 HIV-uninfected participants. Compared with controls, HIV-infected individuals had greater adjusted lean mass and total, trunk, and limb fat gain during the first 96 weeks of ART. Subsequently, HIV-infected individuals lost lean mass compared with controls. Total, trunk, and limb fat gains after 96 weeks of ART slowed in HIV-infected individuals but remained greater than in controls. Lower CD4 T-cell count was associated with lean mass and fat gain during the initial 96 weeks of ART, but subsequently no HIV-related characteristic was associated with body composition change.

CONCLUSION: Consistent with a 'return to health effect', HIV-infected individuals, especially those with lower baseline CD4 T-cell counts, gained more lean mass and fat during the first 96 weeks of ART than HIV-uninfected individuals. Continued fat gain and lean mass loss after 96 weeks may predispose HIV-infected individuals to obesity-related diseases and physical function impairment.

DOI10.1097/QAD.0000000000001248
Alternate JournalAIDS
PubMed ID27662545
PubMed Central IDPMC5101158
Grant ListUM1 AI069494 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
U01 AI035004 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
K23 AG050260 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
K24 AI120834 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UM1 AI069481 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
U01 AI068636 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
K23 AI110532 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG020727 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
K23 AI108358 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
U01 AI042590 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States