Protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy and glucose tolerance in pregnancy: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5084.

TitleProtease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy and glucose tolerance in pregnancy: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5084.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsHitti J, Andersen J, McComsey G, Liu T, Melvin A, Smith L, Stek A, Aberg J, Hull A, Alston-Smith B, D Watts H, Livingston E
Corporate AuthorsAIDS Clinical Trials Group 5084 Study Team
JournalAm J Obstet Gynecol
Volume196
Issue4
Pagination331.e1-7
Date Published2007 Apr
ISSN1097-6868
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Blood Glucose, Diabetes, Gestational, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Administration Schedule, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gestational Age, Glucose Intolerance, Glucose Tolerance Test, HIV Infections, HIV Protease Inhibitors, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Logistic Models, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Pregnancy Outcome, Probability, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Statistics, Nonparametric
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine whether protease inhibitors increase glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in pregnancy.

STUDY DESIGN: In this multicenter, prospective, observational study, 149 human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected pregnant women had fasting insulin, glucose, and C-peptide measured followed by a 1 hour, 50 g glucose test. Glucose intolerance was defined as a 1 hour glucose greater than 130 mg/dL. Glucose intolerance, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and pancreatic beta-cell function, and pregnancy outcomes were compared between those taking protease inhibitors and those not.

RESULTS: Fifty-seven of 149 subjects (38%) had glucose intolerance. Body mass index, Hispanic ethnicity, and maternal age, but not protease inhibitors, were associated with glucose intolerance. There were no differences in insulin resistance, beta-cell function, or pregnancy outcome associated with protease inhibitor use.

CONCLUSIONS: Protease inhibitors do not increase risk of glucose intolerance or insulin resistance among pregnant women.

DOI10.1016/j.ajog.2006.11.037
Alternate JournalAm. J. Obstet. Gynecol.
PubMed ID17403409
Grant ListAI25859 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI25879 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI25883 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI25897 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI25903 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI25915 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI27563 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI27661 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI27664 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI27665 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI27670 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI277664 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI32907 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI34853 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI38855 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI39156 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI42845 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
HD33345 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
M01RR00096 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
N01 HD33345 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
RR000080 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
RR00043 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
RR00044 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
RR00069 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
RR00096 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
U01 AI41089 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UO1 AI38558 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States