GB virus C (GBV-C) infection in hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-coinfected patients receiving HCV treatment: importance of the GBV-C genotype.

TitleGB virus C (GBV-C) infection in hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-coinfected patients receiving HCV treatment: importance of the GBV-C genotype.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsSchwarze-Zander C, Blackard JT, Zheng H, Addo MM, Lin W, Robbins GK, Sherman KE, Zdunek D, Hess G, Chung RT
Corporate AuthorsAIDS Clinical Trial Group A5071 Study Team
JournalJ Infect Dis
Volume194
Issue4
Pagination410-9
Date Published2006 Aug 15
ISSN0022-1899
KeywordsAdult, Antiviral Agents, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Female, GB virus C, Genotype, Hepatitis C, Hepatitis, Viral, Human, HIV Infections, Humans, Interferons, Male, Massachusetts, Prevalence, Retrospective Studies, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, RNA, Viral
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Persistent GB virus C (GBV-C) coinfection leads to slower human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) progression. Despite the existence of multiple GBV-C genotypes, their relevance to the progression of HIV disease is unknown. We therefore investigated (1) the prevalence and genotype of GBV-C in hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-coinfected patients and (2) the impact of HCV treatment on GBV-C RNA clearance.

METHODS: We retrospectively studied 130 HCV/HIV-coinfected patients initiating HCV therapy. Anti-E2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time PCR were used to detect and quantify GBV-C infection. GBV-C genotype was determined by sequencing the 5' untranslated region.

RESULTS: GBV-C infection (past or current) was identified in 111 (85%) of the patients. Ongoing GBV-C replication was detected in 40 patients. Coinfection with GBV-C genotype 2 was associated with significantly higher CD4(+) cell counts. After 24 weeks of HCV therapy, GBV-C RNA clearance was observed in 50% of patients, although this was not associated with changes in HIV load or with CD4(+) cell counts. Sustained GBV-C RNA clearance was observed in 31% of patients with GBV-C RNA detected at baseline.

CONCLUSIONS: GBV-C coinfection was extremely common. GBV-C RNA clearance with HCV therapy was associated with neither short-term loss of HIV control nor impaired immune status. The association of GBV-C genotype 2 with higher CD4(+) cell counts merits further study.

DOI10.1086/505713
Alternate JournalJ. Infect. Dis.
PubMed ID16845623
Grant ListAI38855 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI38858 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
P30-AI42851 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States