Relative sensitivity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to cognitive function among nondemented individuals infected with HIV.

TitleRelative sensitivity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to cognitive function among nondemented individuals infected with HIV.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsPaul RH, Ernst T, Brickman AM, Yiannoutsos CT, Tate DF, Cohen RA, Navia BA
Corporate AuthorsACTG 301 team, ACTG 700 team, HIV MRS Consortium
JournalJ Int Neuropsychol Soc
Volume14
Issue5
Pagination725-33
Date Published2008 Sep
ISSN1469-7661
KeywordsAdult, Affect, Aspartic Acid, Choline, Cognition Disorders, Creatine, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Neuropsychological Tests, Reaction Time
Abstract

In the present study, we examined the relationships among cognitive function, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) brain metabolite indices measured in the basal ganglia, and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the caudate nucleus and the putamen in the earliest stages of HIV-related cognitive involvement. Participants included 22 HIV-positive individuals and 20 HIV-negative individuals. HIV-positive individuals performed significantly more poorly than the HIV-negative individuals on several cognitive measures. In addition, the choline/creatine ratio was significantly higher and the N-acetyl aspartate/choline ratio was significantly lower among HIV patients. The caudate and putamen sizes were smaller among HIV-positive patients compared with controls; however, the differences did not reach statistical significance. Correlation analyses revealed associations between cognitive function and select MRS indices. In addition, caudate size was significantly correlated with performances on higher-order thinking tests whereas putamen size was significantly correlated with performances on motor tests. The results suggest that MRS differences are more pronounced than area size differences between seropositive and seronegative individuals in mild stages of HIV-related cognitive impairment. However, basal ganglia size remains an important contributor to cognitive status in this population. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the evolution of these imaging correlates of HIV-cognitive impairment in HIV.

DOI10.1017/S1355617708080910
Alternate JournalJ Int Neuropsychol Soc
PubMed ID18764968
Grant ListAI38855 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
DA15045 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
K23 MH065857 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
MH60565 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
MH65857 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
NS36524 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH074368 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 NS036524 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States