The frequency of malaria is similar among women receiving either lopinavir/ritonavir or nevirapine-based antiretroviral treatment.

TitleThe frequency of malaria is similar among women receiving either lopinavir/ritonavir or nevirapine-based antiretroviral treatment.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsSkinner-Adams TS, Butterworth AS, Porter KA, D'Amico R, Sawe F, Shaffer D, Siika A, Hosseinipour MC, Stringer E, Currier JS, Chipato T, Salata R, Lockman S, Eron JJ, Meshnick SR, McCarthy JS
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue4
Paginatione34399
Date Published2012
ISSN1932-6203
KeywordsFemale, HIV Infections, HIV Protease Inhibitors, Humans, Lopinavir, Malaria, Nevirapine, Ritonavir
Abstract

HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) show antimalarial activity in vitro and in animals. Whether this translates into a clinical benefit in HIV-infected patients residing in malaria-endemic regions is unknown. We studied the incidence of malaria, as defined by blood smear positivity or a positive Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 antigen test, among 444 HIV-infected women initiating antiretroviral treatment (ART) in the OCTANE trial (A5208; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00089505). Participants were randomized to treatment with PI-containing vs. PI-sparing ART, and were followed prospectively for ≥48 weeks; 73% also received cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. PI-containing treatment was not associated with protection against malaria in this study population.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0034399
Alternate JournalPLoS ONE
PubMed ID22509297
PubMed Central IDPMC3317955
Grant ListP30 AI050410 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UM1 AI069423 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States