ACTG HIV RESERVOIRS COHORT STUDY DEMONSTRATES THAT PERSISTENT HIV DNA IN SPINAL FLUID MAY BE ASSOCIATED WITH COGNITIVE CHALLENGES

July 15, 2019

Los Angeles, Calif. – Investigators from the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the world’s largest and longest-established HIV research network, today announced that the Journal of Clinical Investigation published new findings from the ACTG HIV Reservoirs Cohort Study (A5321). The study found that HIV DNA remained in the cerebrospinal fluid of half of participants with well-managed HIV (virologic suppression in the plasma), confirming that the central nervous system (CNS) is a major reservoir for latent HIV. Individuals who harbored HIV DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid were more likely than other study participants to experience cognitive deficits on neurocognitive testing.

ACTG PRESENTS NEW RESEARCH ON HIV AND TB, CO-MORBIDITIES, TREATMENT PARADIGMS, AND CURE AT CROI 2019

February 26, 2019

The AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the world’s largest and longest-established HIV research network, funded by NIAID at the U.S. NIH, will make 11 oral and 19 poster presentations at CROI 2019 (Seattle, March 4-7). Several have the potential to influence clinical practice and guidelines for care.
“For more than 30 years, the ACTG has been at the forefront of research to treat HIV and its coinfections and comorbidities,“ said ACTG Chair Judith Currier, M.D., MSc of the University of California Los Angeles. “These studies represent the breadth of ACTG investigations and offer important insights into the treatment of MDR-TB, how to approach antiretroviral treatment in resource-limited settings, and strategies to address chronic complications of HIV.”