HIV in the News

Published on: March 9, 2017
This fact sheet provides statistical data and information about HIV among women.
Published on: March 9, 2017
March 10 is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWGHAAD), a time when organizations and communities across the United States come together to offer support, encourage discussion, and teach women and girls about the prevention of HIV, the importance of getting tested, and how to live with and manage HIV infection.
Published on: March 9, 2017
View exclusive behind-the-scenes footage of the Start Talking. Stop HIV. campaign featuring gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men.
Published on: February 28, 2017
March 10 is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWGHAAD), a time when organizations and communities across the United States come together to offer support, encourage discussion, and teach women and girls about the prevention of HIV, the importance of getting tested, and how to live with and manage HIV infection.
Published on: February 21, 2017
The Doing It campaign has added new Spanish videos showcasing various Hispanic/Latino participants who are testing for HIV in order to know their status and stay healthy.
Published on: February 15, 2017
Start Talking. Stop HIV. has recently launched a refresh of the campaign to feature more diversity from our community in the images and content. The refresh includes a modern and engaging website, 10 new videos, and new campaign materials (e.g., posters) available to share or download in both English and in Spanish. Please check out the new site!
Published on: February 14, 2017
Latest HIV testing recommendations during pregnancy for obstetrical providers. Try out the interactive calculator now!
Published on: February 9, 2017
This consumer information sheet describes the basics of PEP.
Published on: February 7, 2017
This study suggests that the disparity in HIV diagnosis rates for black women, compared to Hispanic/Latina and white women, may be decreasing, a good sign that targeted prevention efforts are working. However, disparities have not disappeared, and black women continue to have a much higher rate of HIV diagnoses than Hispanic/Latina or white women.
Published on: February 7, 2017
A second MMWR article highlights the need for strong efforts to improve care outcomes among blacks living with HIV. At the end of 2013, only 49% of blacks living with diagnosed HIV had a suppressed viral load—the lowest proportion for any race/ethnicity in the United States.

Pages