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HIV in the News

Published on: February 26, 2015

Twelve weeks daclatasvir and Sovaldi offered a hep C 97 percent cure rate among those with genotypes 1 through 4 who were coinfected with HIV.

Published on: February 26, 2015

A large-scale program offering HIV-positive people financial incentives to get into medical care and to maintain a fully suppressed virus has failed overall.

Published on: February 25, 2015

Bristol-Myers Squibb’s investigatory maturation inhibitor BMS-955176 showed promise in an early trial examining its potency against HIV.

Published on: February 25, 2015

The cancer rate of Americans diagnosed with HIV is an estimated 50 percent greater than that of the HIV-negative population.

Published on: February 25, 2015

Given to treatment-experienced people with HIV, the attachment inhibitor BMS-663068 demonstrated potentcy in the range of Norvir-boosted Reyataz.

Published on: February 25, 2015

The average CD4 count of HIV-positive sub-Saharan Africans upon diagnosis or starting treatment has not risen over the past decade, indicating an overall failure to detect and treat the virus earlier in the course of HIV disease.

Published on: February 24, 2015

Researchers have estimated that preventing HIV in one high-risk individual saves an estimated $229,800 to $338,500 in lifetime medical costs.

Published on: February 24, 2015

A trial of a Viread (tenofovir)-containing vaginal gel to protect against HIV has failed because the South African women participants used it at such low rates.

Published on: February 24, 2015

A strategy of taking Truvada as PrEP only in the days surrounding intercourse reduced the overall risk of HIV by 86 percent among gay men. However, the ongoing study has thus far failed to determine whether the dosing protocol itself was responsible for the reduction in risk, as opposed to the fact that the study participants ultimately wound up taking Truvada with some level of regularity.

Published on: February 24, 2015

A group of British gay and bi men given Truvada as PrEP had an overall 86 percent lower risk of HIV as a consequence.

Funded by the US Department of Health & Human Services, the National Institutes of Health,
the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and the Division of AIDS.